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This site currently uses WordPress, but I think something more robust and extensive is needed for the online community. View full article »

The user-centered design process can successfully improve the accessibility of a mainstream real-time strategy computer game for players with physical disabilities. View full article »

Accessibility audits are effective at identifying any accessibility barriers caused by a failure to meet accessibility guidelines, but that does not necessarily prevent users from experiencing accessibility barriers. View full article »

An accessibility audit measures the ability for users to accomplish a predefined set of tasks against applicable accessibility guidelines and then documents any barriers experienced by those users. View full article »

The two primary goals during this phase are to evaluate the previously designed custom map prototype and keyboard accessibility script by conducting an accessibility audit and usability testing.

The Warcraft III World Editor was used to create both the Defense of the Ancients (DotA) and The Sword of a Thousand Truths (TSoaTT) custom maps. View full article »

The custom map prototype is humorously (yet appropriately) dubbed The Sword of a Thousand Truths (TSoaTT) inspired by the South Park episode, “Make Love, Not Warcraft” (Season 10). The design concept behind TSoaTT is straightforward: create the simplest small-scale representation of DotA that requires the same nine user tasks to be performed. View full article »

The two primary goals during this phase are to use the previous analysis of user personas, user tasks, and accessibility guidelines to design the custom map prototype and keyboard accessibility script.

Obviously these tasks are completely irrelevant for websites users, but it is possible there are web accessibility guidelines that could be relevant to these tasks. View full article »

User tasks are only relevant to the environment in which the user operates, so the task-relevant aspects of DotA must be defined first. View full article »